Localisation

The internationalisation or localisation of your software programmes is essential to remaining competitive in target markets and gaining a foothold in new sales markets.

Localisation of software or programmes consists of translating user interfaces (menus, buttons, dialogue boxes, etc.), system reports, error messages and software resources such as handbooks or online help.

Years of full-time employment and experience in translation, software localisation and project management taught me how to translate contextless messages and character strings as well as appreciate sensible length limitations. Localising software interfaces is not the same as standard translating. Distinct punctuation rules must be observed when localising into German, for instance. Moreover, texts to be localised contain variables, wildcard characters, control characters and keyboard shortcuts. In addition, the space available for text in menus, options or buttons might be limited. Software localisers must therefore observe length limitations.

 

Software localisation

Localisation of software or programmes consists of translating user interfaces, messages and software resources.